Graduate Division

Master of Conservation and Restoration Science

Section 1

Overview

The Masters in Conservation and Restoration Science (MCRS) through the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) and the Center for Environmental Biology (CEB) in the School of Biological Sciences is a professional degree program designed to provide graduates with the skills and knowledge base necessary to hold leadership and management positions in environmental fields related to conservation, restoration, and sustainability. This is a highly collaborative program, portions of which will embed students into real-world conservation and restoration settings through community partnerships.

What Sets Us Apart?

Students who graduate from the MCRS program will be able to lead and collaborate in the planning, design, implementation, and management of complex, large-scale environmental conservation and restoration activities, in agency, non-profit, and for-profit settings.  The MCRS program will integrate academic scholarship in ecology and evolutionary biology, training in natural resource management and stewardship, professional development (leadership training in agency, non-profit and for-profit conservation), and community engagement (translational partnerships in research and education).  MCRS graduates will have broad knowledge in applied ecosystem and community ecology in addition to training in the use of Geographical Information Systems (GIS), remote sensing, and informatics (data analysis and management).  The MCRS program differs from other similar graduate programs in the following ways:

  • Includes formal training, practice, and coursework in Restoration Ecology.
  • Involves community-engaged research with community partners who are unique in their localized kinds of non-profits, agency level, and for-profit industry groups.
  • Provides professional development training.
  • Develops leadership, project and data management, and science translation skills.

Quick Facts

Program Type

Professional Master's Program

Normative Time to Degree

2 years

Capstone Type

Capstone Project

Accordion Section

Admissions Requirements

A B.A. or B.S., preferably in Biology, Conservation Biology, Ecology, or Environmental Science (or comparable degree title) from a fully accredited academic institution, is required for admission. Applicants with undergraduate degrees in areas such as Social Ecology, Public Health, Environmental Policy, or other similar degree titles are considered, but must demonstrate proficiency in the natural sciences and/or practical experience working in the professional field as documented below:

Undergraduate preparation should include a minimum of:

  • One full year of biological sciences
  • One full year of chemistry
  • One semester or quarter of calculus or statistics
Experience from professional activities will be evaluated by faculty and staff in the program, but extended practical experience in ecology, conservation, restoration, or environmental engineering may be an acceptable substitute for one or more of the requirements above, depending on the nature of the experience. The GRE is not required.

Applicants must demonstrate that they possess academic potential for graduate study and meet the general requirements of the UCI Graduate Division. In addition to the requirements above, selection for admission is based on the following criteria:

  • A minimum overall grade point average of 3.0 in undergraduate academic course work
  • Two confidential letters of recommendation
  • A statement of purpose (describing the applicant’s goals in seeking the Master’s degree)
  • A resume (noting relevant work/academic experience)

Applicants apply directly to the Graduate Division for the MCRS program beginning each fall. The program uses rolling admission deadlines. The priority deadline is February 1; applications received by this date are read first, and next fall’s class begins to fill from this group. April 1 is the normal deadline; the remainder of the class is filled from these applicants. If the class is not full after each review of the April 1 applicants, additional applications will be accepted until July 1.

Financial Support

The MCRS program is considered a professional masters degree program and unlike traditional MS/PhD programs, students are not conducting research in the lab of one specific advisor/faculty member and are therefore not eligible for traditional research assistantship positions.  Rather, our students spend time working with teams of faculty, staff, and practitioners in the local conservation and restoration community on real-world environmental problems.  We do work very hard to seek external funding for students through grant agencies and foundations, internships, etc. but this type of funding is not fully guaranteed.
 
For information regarding financial aid, please visit:  https://grad.uci.edu/funding/financial-aid.php

Tuition & Fees

MCRS 2018-19 Fees Fall 2018 Winter 2019 Spring 2019 Annual
Program Fee * 7,742.00 7,742.00 7,742.00 23,226.00
Assoc. Grad Students Fee † 9.00 9.00 9.00 27.00
Student Center Fee † 137.88 137.88 137.87 413.63
Bren Events Center Fee † 23.00 23.00 23.00 69.00
Recreation Center Fee † 88.00 88.00 88.00 264.00
eTech Fee ‡ 60.00 60.00 60.00 180.00
Total Fees Paid $7,999.88 $7,999.88 $7,999.87 $23,999.63

Posted 10 August 2018 at http://reg.uci.edu/fees/2018-2019/conservation.html

The tuition, fees, and charges posted to your billing statement or account are estimates based on currently approved amounts. These figures may not be final. Actual tuition, fees, and charges are subject to change by the Regents of the University of California and could be affected by increases or reductions in State funding, or other developments. Accordingly, final approved levels (and thus your final balance due) may differ from the amounts shown.

MCRS students pay an annual fee regardless of the year their cohort entered.

† Campus-based fees include the Assoc. Grad Students Fee, Student Center Fee, Bren Events Center Fee, and Recreation Center Fee. For 2018-19, total fees paid include annual campus-based fees of $773.63 and quarterly campus-based fees of $257.88 for Fall 2018 and Winter 2019, and $257.87 for Spring 2019.

‡ The non-refundable eTech Fee is required of all students and is used to support the maintenance and improvement of existing education technology, and new services and capabilities. The eTech fee is listed separately as the charged amount varies based on the amount of undergraduate units the student is enrolled in and is assessed later in the term than the other fees listed. The fee is $4 per unit of undergraduate lecture course, up to a maximum amount of $60 (or 15 units) per quarter. It will be assessed after the third week of instruction. The $60 eTech Fee included on this chart reflects the maximum possible fee.

Core Faculty

Nancy M. Aguilar-Roca, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Lecturer with Potential Security of Employment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Steven D. Allison, Ph.D. Stanford University, Associate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Earth System Science


Peter R. Atsatt, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


John C. Avise, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, UCI Distinguished Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Manny Azizi, Ph.D. University of Massachusetts, Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Alan G. Barbour, M.D. Tufts University, Professor of Microbiology and Molecular Genetics; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Medicine


Albert F. Bennett, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor Emeritus of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Rudi C. Berkelhamer, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Senior Lecturer Emerita of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Peter A. Bowler, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Senior Lecturer of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Matthew E. Bracken, Ph.D. Oregon State University, Associate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Timothy J. Bradley, Ph.D. University of British Columbia, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Adriana D. Briscoe, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Nancy T. Burley, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Robin M. Bush, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Associate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Diane R. Campbell, Ph.D. Duke University, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


F. Lynn Carpenter, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emerita of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Michael T. Clegg, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Donald Bren Professor and Professor Emeritus of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


James J. Emerson, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Celia Faiola, Ph.D. Washington State University, Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Steven A. Frank, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Donald Bren Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Logic and Philosophy of Science


Brandon S. Gaut, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Donovan German, Ph.D. University of Florida, Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Michael L. Goulden, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Earth System Science; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Bradford A. Hawkins, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


James W. Hicks, Ph.D. University of New Mexico, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Bradley S. Hughes, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer with Security of Employment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Education


George L. Hunt, Jr., Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Travis E. Huxman, Ph.D. University of Nevada, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Mahtab F. Jafari, Pharm.D. University of California, San Francisco, Vice Chair and Director of the Center for Healthspan Pharmacology and Professor of Pharmaceutical Sciences; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Pharmacology (anti-aging pharmacology and preventive medicine)


Natalia Komarova, Ph.D. University of Arizona, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Mathematics; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (applied and computational mathematics, mathematical and computational biology, mathematics of complex and social phenomena)


Harold Koopowitz, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Anthony D. Long, Ph.D. McMaster University, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Pharmaceutical Sciences


Catherine Loudon, Ph.D. Duke University, Senior Lecturer of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Richard E. MacMillen, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Adam Martiny, Ph.D. Technical University of Denmark, Associate Professor of Earth System Science; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Jennifer Martiny, Ph.D. Stanford University, UCI Chancellors' Fellow and Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Matthew J. McHenry, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Kailen Mooney, Ph.D. University of Colorado Boulder, Associate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Laurence D. Mueller, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


R. Michael Mulligan, Ph.D. Michigan State University, Biological Sciences Associate Dean of Graduate Studies and Professor of Developmental and Cell Biology; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (RNA editing in plant mitochondria and chloroplasts)


Jessica Pratt, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer with Potential Security of Employment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


James T. Randerson, Ph.D. Stanford University, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Earth System Science; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Jose Mari Ranz Navalpotro, Ph.D. Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, Associate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Michael R. Rose, Ph.D. University of Sussex, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Ann K. Sakai, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Cascade J. Sorte, Ph.D. University of California, Davis, Assistant Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Richard Symanski, Ph.D. Syracuse University, Senior Lecturer of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Kevin Thornton, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Associate Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Kathleen K. Treseder, Ph.D. Stanford University, Francisco J. Ayala Chair and UCI Chancellor's Fellow and Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Arthur Weis, Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Professor Emeritus of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Stephen G. Weller, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


Dominik Franz X. Wodarz, Ph.D. Oxford University, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Mathematics


Guiyun Yan, Ph.D. University of Vermont, Professor of Program in Public Health; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Program in Public Health

Academic Data

Data is not yet available, as this is a new program.

Career Outcomes

Data is not yet available, as this is a new program.

Students & Alumni