Graduate Division

Mathematics Ph.D.

Section 1

Overview

The Graduate Program in Mathematics offers a MS and a PhD degree. The MS degree is obtained in two years through a combination of courses and examinations. Completion of the PhD degree takes between 5 and 6 years and is comprised of a preparatory phase (coursework and examinations) and a (original) research phase in one of our faculty research areas. The latter span a wide range of fields from pure to applied and include Algebra and Number Theory, Analysis and Partial Differential Equations, Applied and Computational Mathematics, Ergodic Theory and Dynamical System, Geometry and Topology, Logic, Mathematical Physics, and Probability.

What Sets Us Apart?

The Department of Mathematics boasts a wide range of active research areas of current interest ranging from pure mathematics to applied mathematics. Research performed in the department enjoys international recognition as witnessed by current research rankings and several prestigious awards received by its faculty. Graduates successfully pursue academic careers at research and teaching universities and colleges, join private and governmental research labs, or apply their skills in a variety of industries which include finance, data and computer science, engineering, and more. The Department has highly respected groups in Algebra and Number Theory, Applied & Computational Math, Analysis and Partial Differential Equations, Dynamical Systems, Geometry and Topology, Logic and Foundations, Mathematical Physics, and Probability. The Applied & Computational Math group features a very broad spectrum of traditional applied fields as well as more recent ones such as Data Science and Mathematical/Computational (Systems) Biology.  The current 38 research faculty members advise and mentor a population of about 100 students and more than 10 postdoctoral scholars at any given time. The department hosts a large number of weekly research seminars and organizes a wide range of outreach activities that students are encouraged to participate in. Students are offered opportunities for professional development and learn skills that are highly marketable preparing them for their future careers in academia or industry.

Quick Facts

Program Type

Doctoral Program

Normative Time to Degree

6 years

Capstone Type

Dissertation

Accordion Section

Admissions Requirements

We accept applications for the fall quarter only. A complete application with all supporting documents must be received by the deadline.  Please refer to the link at the bottom of the page for additional information from Graduate Division.

A completed application includes the following:

A completed UC Irvine Graduate Division online application, including the application fee ($105.00 for US Citizens/lawful Permanent Residents, $125 for all other applicants). This payment must be paid by credit card only; checks will no longer be accepted. FEE WAIVERS information.

  • Transcripts – Applicants must upload unofficial transcripts for all institutions attended since high school.  If an applicant is admitted, official transcripts will be requested only from the institutions were a degree was earned. Foreign applicants must provide transcripts converted to English, and a calculated US GPA
  • Personal History Statement – This will be required by all students, please see the Graduate Division website for more information.
  • Letters of Recommendation – We require three letters of recommendation. Letters must be uploaded digitally; paper LORs will not be accepted.
  • GRE – Official scores are required for the General and Subject GRE exam taken within the last five years for MS & PhD applicants. Subject GRE scores are mandatory for all PhD applicants.  PhD applications will not be reviewed without Subject GRE scores.  MS applications will be reviewed; however, priority will be given to applicants with Subject GRE scores.  No minimum score requirement.  GRE scores are sent directly from ETS, choose Institution Code 4859.


*If you are applying to the Math PhD program, and you have obtained a Subject GRE score in a subject other than math, please contact Professor Guidotti gpatrick@math.uci.edu for further consultation.

  • TOEFL scores - Required for applicants whose primary language is not English. The TOEFL requirement, for admission purposes only, and will be waived for applicants who have received a post-baccalaureate degree from a U.S. college or University. Please send your official TOEFL or IETS scores to UC Irvine choose Institution Code 4859.


Additional English proficiency information can be found HERE.

International Students - International and permanent resident graduate students who are not citizens of countries where English is either the primary or dominant language (as approved by the UC Irvine Graduate Council) who wish to be considered for appointment as a Teaching Assistant (TA) must have a score of at least 26 in the speaking component of TOEFL iBT or a score of 8 or higher on the speaking module of the IELTS exam.  This is a university requirement, the department cannot make exceptions for scores below 26 or 8, respectively.

For more admission information, please visit the UC Irvine Graduate Division Admissions FAQ page.

APPLY NOW - School of Physical Sciences, Mathematics Department, specify PhD or MS.  Indicate specific area of interest in the space provided.

For further questions, please contact Aubrey Rudd at: aubrey.rudd@uci.edu.

Please note that our response time my take long than usual, during the admissions and recruitment season.

Financial Support

Several types of financial assistance are available to Graduate Students at UCI.  These include fellowships, teaching and research assistantships, and tuition fellowships for nonresident students, grants-in-aid, and student loans.  Entering or continuing Graduate Students may be awarded research or teaching assistantships for all or part of the academic year.  The Financial Aid Office can provide you with information about assistance based upon financial need, including grants and loans.  Additional information regarding financial aid is available HERE.


Teaching Assistantships

A 50% Teaching Assistant position (TA) in the Department of Mathematics comprises a workload of no more than 220 service hours per quarter. UCI and the Department assume a full-time Graduate Student receiving a Teaching Assistantship does not have any other employment during the academic year.  During academic sessions, Graduate Students may not be employed in any capacity by the University beyond a maximum of 50% service time.  All Academic Student Employees are covered by a collective bargaining contract.  For further information on student employment, see the Office of Graduate Studies website.


Discussion Sections

A 50% TA assignment consists of two discussion sections plus time in the Department's tutoring center.  For each discussion section you are assigned, you will spend 2 hours per week in the classroom conducting discussion sections; 2-4 hours per week in the tutoring center, depending on the teaching assignment; 1 office hour per week, to work with students; and 5 hours per week as assigned for preparation, grading exams and quizzes, etc.  A standard assignment will be two discussion sections per quarter (this is a 50% appointment). Each discussion section meets twice a week for one hour each session. The course instructor determines how the discussions will be conducted, and it is your responsibility to contact the instructor prior to the beginning of each quarter, and weekly thereafter.  For example, you will give quizzes, review material, and supplement the lecture.  Do not cancel or reschedule your discussion section. Absences must be covered by your Teaching Buddy.


Tutoring Hours

Part of the duties of a teaching assistant will be 1-2 hours per week in the tutoring center.  Teaching Assistants are required to schedule their tutoring hours with the Graduate Affairs Officer.  It is imperative for you to be in the tutoring center, in the assigned place, at the assigned time. Students are free to drop in for help at any time during that hour.   Again, absences are covered by your Teaching Buddy.  Please remember -- the Department of Mathematics is offering this service to students.  In order for the service to be effective, please be reliable and courteous. Tutoring starts the second week of classes and continues through finals week. TA's must login and log out of the timekeeping program in the tutoring center.  Failure to login/logout will be viewed as an absence.  An uncovered absence from the tutoring center is failure to fulfill part of the obligations of the Teaching Assistantship. Such absences may result in a reduction of the percentage appointment, resulting in a reduction in pay.


Office Hours

You must have one office hour per week per discussion section.   By the start of the second week of classes, you will choose a time for your office hours.  Please give this time to the Graduate Affairs Officer for posting.


TA Assignments and Workload

TA's should contact the appropriate instructor(s) as soon as you receive your assignment.  The assigned workload is measured by how many hours the University could reasonably expect a TA to take to satisfactorily complete the work assigned.  A TA with a 50% appointment will be assigned a workload of no more than 220 hours per quarter.  (This applies proportionately to other percent appointments.)  This can be used at the instructors' discretion for preparation, attending course lectures, grading, or discussion with the instructor. The TA orientation is considered part of the workload for the term.  TA's should initiate discussions with the instructor if they anticipate any workload-related issues.  Should you have questions or concerns regarding your workload it is your responsibility to contact the Graduate Affairs Officer (Donna McConnell) in a timely manner.  It is necessary that you establish and maintain frequent communication with the instructor(s) and with the Department.  It is advised that you check your Department mailbox and e-mail every day.


Teaching Buddies

If you are unable to make your discussion section you must contact your Teaching Buddy and let the instructor know.  It is important that this is done as soon as you are aware of the need.  Your Teaching Buddy is another TA who has agreed (in advance) to cover your assignment in case of an emergency.  You are required to find your own Teaching Buddy, someone who either is or has been a TA in your course.  You need a buddy for each discussion section assigned.  This can be the same person, just make sure you are covered. This information must be given to the Graduate Affairs Officer by the start of the second week of classes, generally at the same time tutoring hours, office hours are listed. The Graduate Affairs Officer will notify all TA’s by email.


Academic Credit for Supervised University Teaching

Being a TA entitles you to enroll in a course titled "University Teaching," Math 399, for one to four units of credit per quarter.   Those teaching assistants, who otherwise would not be enrolled for 12 units of graduate or upper-division credit and would not be recognized as full time for enrollment reporting and budgetary purposes, must enroll for 399 credits no later than the second week of instruction.  Authorization codes are required for 399, contact the Graduate Affairs Officer for the code.


Academic Criteria for TA Appointment

The Graduate Studies Committee and the Graduate Admissions and Advising Committees decide who will receive Teaching Assistantships.   The committee bases its selections on (1) Your academic progress (coursework, examinations, etc.);  (2) Your previous TA work, including student evaluations; and (3) Faculty recommendations.

The following University criteria must be met:

- Enrollment in at least 12 units in the current quarter.
- Combined campus-wide employment of no more than 50 percent time during the academic session.
- International and permanent resident graduate students, whose primary language is not English, must take and pass the TSE (Test of Spoken English) or the S.P.E.A.K. exam with a score of 50 or better or the T.O.E.P. exam with a score of 5 or better.  Effective Fall 05, the following test scores have also been approved: a minimum score of 8 on the speaking portion of the I.E.L.T.S. or a minimum score of 26 on the speaking portion of the TOEFL-iBT

For continuing students during each of the three most recent quarters of enrollment:

- Completion of 8 units or more of upper division or graduate level credit courses.
- A letter grade of C,S or above in all courses completed.
- No more than two incomplete (I) grades
- A cumulative GPA of 3.1 or higher
- Satisfactory progress toward degree objectives
- Teaching Assistant Appointment Periods and Limitations

Teaching Assistantships are for one quarter, two quarters, or an academic year.  Graduate students who have not advanced to candidacy for the doctorate, may be appointed as a Teaching Assistant or Teaching Associate for a maximum of 12 quarters including the full period of the current or proposed appointment.  Following advancement to candidacy, a doctoral student can be appointed to an additional 6 quarters for a total maximum of 18 appointment quarters.  The quarters are counted regardless of appointment percentage.


Fee-Offsets for Teaching Assistant Appointments

The Office of Graduate Studies will pay the Graduate Student Health Insurance Fee and a partial fee remission of 100% of the annual educational and registration fees for TAs with appointments of 25% or more for an entire quarter.  The remaining balance of the student fees to be paid by the student for the academic year will be $256.50 per quarter or $769.50 for the academic year.


Evaluations

TAs are evaluated by students each quarter.  All evaluations will be completed online. Evaluations for the last year of academic residence will be maintained in your graduate file for 5 years after you leave UCI; they will be used for your Letters of Recommendation.


Payroll

Teaching Assistants are paid on the 1st day of the month.  To receive your pay you have two options: 1) Departmental pickup or 2) Surepay (Direct Deposit).  Select one of these options at the time your employment paperwork is signed or you can change your selection electronically through DEFT. You can view your earnings statement HERE.

Please be aware that fall quarter Teaching Assistants will not receive their first paycheck until the first week of November, therefore other financial provisions should be made for this period.

Fellowships


Research Assistantship and External Grants

The University of California is the State's primary research institution.  Much scholarly research and creative activity is supported by University funds or by grants and contracts from federal and state agencies, foundations, corporations, and individual sponsors.  The office of Research and Graduate Studies also maintains a resource center containing the most current information about extramural funding sources for student and faculty research.  Please refer to the Office of Research and Graduate Studies.

 
Non-Resident Tuition Waivers

Students who are not residents of California are charged in addition to fees, nonresident tuition, which is currently $5,034.00 per quarter or $15,102 per year for each year of attendance required by the curriculum.  Non-resident students are required to become CA residents prior to their second year of attendance. Please refer to Residency requirements.  Students who have advanced to candidacy for the Ph.D. are eligible for a reduction in the nonresident tuition for a period of three years.  Outstanding non-resident applicants may be eligible for a full or partial tuition waiver as part of their admission award package.  This tuition reduction must have prior approval through the Office of Graduate Studies and the Registrar's Office.

 
Continuing Student Fellowships

Summer Support
For continuing Graduate Students, there are two Summer Sessions. Depending on your status you may be eligible for an Instructorship, Teaching Assistantship, and/or Reader position during the Summer Sessions.

Summer Research
For continuing Graduate Students, research experience must be aligned with thesis or dissertation, substantial stipend. This is generally supported by the faculty advisor's research grant.

Fee Fellowship
Based on available funding.

President's Dissertation Year Fellowship
This prestigious dissertation year program is intended for diversity students who are in their final year of graduate study and who are planning to pursue teaching or research appointments soon after the end of their dissertation fellowship year.   It is expected that candidates will complete Ph.D. requirements during the award year. Provides substantial stipend (9 month tenure), student fees, and $500.00 research/travel allowance.  This is a campus wide competitive fellowship with nominations due generally in April for the following academic year.

Dissertation Fellowship (one-quarter award)
For students who have advanced to candidacy and are at critical and/or final stages of dissertation.  Current award amounts are estimated at a stipend of $5,400 for the quarter and payment of the respective quarter's California resident fees.

GAANN (Graduate Assistance in Areas of National Need)
This funding is provided by the United States Department of Education and will provide several Mathematics graduate students with need based fellowships. The GAANN fellowships are given to outstanding students who meet several GAANN requirements. The Graduate Committee will select GAANN fellows each year.

Tuition & Fees

Graduate/Credential Student Fees 2018-19

  Fall 2018 Winter 2019 Spring 2019 Annual
Student Services Fee 376.00 376.00 376.00 1,128.00
Tuition 3,814.00 3,814.00 3,814.00 11,442.00
Assoc. Grad Students Fee 9.00 9.00 9.00 27.00
Student Center Fee 137.88 137.88 137.87 413.63
Bren Events Center Fee 23.00 23.00 23.00 69.00
Recreation Center Fee 88.00 88.00 88.00 264.00
eTech Fee * 60.00 60.00 60.00 180.00
Document Fee † 80.00 0.00 0.00 80.00
Student Health Insurance 1,348.00 1,347.00 1,347.00 4,042.00
Total California Resident $5,795.88 $5,794.88 $5,794.87 $17,385.63
Nonresident Supplemental Tuition 5,034.00 5,034.00 5,034.00 15,102.00
Total Nonresident $10,829.88 $10,828.88 $10,828.87 $32,487.63

Posted 10 August 2018 at http://reg.uci.edu/fees/2018-2019/graduate.html

The tuition, fees, and charges posted to your billing statement or account are estimates based on currently approved amounts. These figures may not be final. Actual tuition, fees, and charges are subject to change by the Regents of the University of California and could be affected by increases or reductions in State funding, or other developments. Accordingly, final approved levels (and thus your final balance due) may differ from the amounts shown.

The non-refundable eTech Fee is required of all students and is used to support the maintenance and improvement of existing education technology, and new services and capabilities. The eTech fee is listed separately as the charged amount varies based on the amount of undergraduate units the student is enrolled in and is assessed later in the term than the other fees listed. The fee is $4 per unit of undergraduate lecture course, up to a maximum amount of $60 (or 15 units) per quarter. It will be assessed after the third week of instruction. The $60 eTech Fee included on this chart reflects the maximum possible fee.

† The Document Fee provides lifetime access to official transcripts and academic verifications without a fee for in-person pickup or delivery by USPS. In addition, there is no fee for mailing the initial diploma. Effective Fall 2018, new undergraduate, professional, and graduate students are assessed the one-time document fee. Eligible students are able to use financial aid to cover the Document Fee.

Core Faculty

Takeo Akasaki, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (ring theory)


Jun F. Allard, Ph.D. University of British Columbia, Assistant Professor of Mathematics; Physics and Astronomy (mathematical and computational biology)


Pierre F. Baldi, Ph.D. California Institute of Technology, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Computer Science; Biological Chemistry; Biomedical Engineering; Developmental and Cell Biology; Mathematics (bioinformatics, computational biology)


Vladimir Baranovsky, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Associate Professor of Mathematics (algebra and number theory)


Frank B. Cannonito, Ph.D. Adelphi University, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (group theory)


Long Chen, Ph.D. Pennsylvania State University, Professor of Mathematics (applied and computational mathematics)


Michael C. Cranston, Ph.D. University of Minnesota, Professor of Mathematics (probability)


Donald A. Darling, Ph.D. California Institute of Technology, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics


Christopher J. Davis, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lecturer with Potential Security of Employment of Mathematics (algebra and number theory)


Neil Donaldson, Ph.D. University of Bath, Lecturer of Mathematics (differential geometry)


Paul C. Eklof, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (logic and algebra)


German A. Enciso Ruiz, Ph.D. Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey, Associate Professor of Mathematics; Developmental and Cell Biology (applied and computational mathematics, mathematical and computational biology)


Aleksandr Figotin, Ph.D. Tashkent University of Information Technologies, Professor of Mathematics (applied and computational mathematics, mathematical physics)


Mark Finkelstein, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics; Center for Educational Partnerships (analysis)


Matthew Foreman, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Mathematics; Logic and Philosophy of Science (ergodic theory and dynamical systems, logic and foundations)


Michael D. Fried, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (arithmetic geometry and complex variables)


Isaac Goldbring, Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Assistant Professor of Mathematics (logic and foundations)


Anton Gorodetski, Ph.D. Moscow State University, Professor of Mathematics (ergodic theory and dynamical systems)


Patrick Q. Guidotti, Ph.D. University of Zurich, Professor of Mathematics (analysis and partial differential equations, applied and computational mathematics)


Hamid Hezari, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Assistant Professor of Mathematics (analysis and partial differential equations)


Svetlana Jitomirskaya, Ph.D. Moscow State University, Professor of Mathematics (mathematical physics)


Nathan Kaplan, Ph.D. Harvard University, Assistant Professor of Mathematics (algebra and number theory)


Abel Klein, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Professor of Mathematics (mathematical physics)


Natalia Komarova, Ph.D. University of Arizona, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Mathematics; Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (applied and computational mathematics, mathematical and computational biology, mathematics of complex and social phenomena)


Jason Russell Kronewetter, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Mathematics


Katsiaryna Krupchyk, Ph.D. Belarusian State University, Associate Professor of Mathematics (analysis and partial differential equations, inverse problems)


Rachel Lehman, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Mathematics (mathematics education and probability)


Peter Li, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (geometry and topology)


Song-Ying Li, Ph.D. University of Pittsburgh, Professor of Mathematics (analysis and partial differential equations)


John S. Lowengrub, Ph.D. Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Mathematics; Biomedical Engineering; Chemical Engineering and Materials Science (applied and computational mathematics, mathematical and computational biology)


Zhiqin Lu, Ph.D. Courant Institute of Mathematical Sciences, Professor of Mathematics (geometry and topology)


Penelope J. Maddy, Ph.D. Princeton University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Logic and Philosophy of Science; Mathematics; Philosophy (philosophy of mathematics and logic, meta-philosophy)


Eric D. Mjolsness, Ph.D. California Institute of Technology, Professor of Computer Science; Mathematics (applied mathematics, mathematical biology, modeling languages)


Qing Nie, Ph.D. Ohio State University, Director of Center for Mathematical and Computational Biology and UCI Chancellor's Professor of Mathematics; Biomedical Engineering (computational mathematics, systems biology, cell signaling, stem cell)


Alessandra Pantano, Ph.D. Princeton University, Lecturer with Security of Employment of Mathematics (algebra and number theory)


David L. Rector, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (algebraic topology and computer algebra)


Robert C. Reilly, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (geometry and topology)


Karl Rubin, Ph.D. Harvard University, Edward and Vivian Thorp Chair in Mathematics and Professor of Mathematics (algebra and number theory)


Bernard Russo, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (functional analysis)


Donald G. Saari, Ph.D. Purdue University, UCI Distinguished Professor Emeritus of Economics; Logic and Philosophy of Science; Mathematics


Martin Schechter, Ph.D. New York University, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (analysis and partial differential equations, mathematical physics)


Stephen Scheinberg, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics


Richard M. Schoen, Ph.D. Stanford University, UCI Excellence in Teaching Chair in Mathematics and Professor of Mathematics (differential geometry, partial differential equations, general relativity)


Alice Silverberg, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Mathematics; Computer Science (algebra and number theory)


William H. Smoke, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (homological algebra)


Knut Solna, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Mathematics (applied and computational mathematics, inverse problems and imaging, probability)


Ronald J. Stern, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (geometry and topology)


Jeffrey D. Streets, Ph.D. Duke University, Associate Professor of Mathematics (geometry and topology)


Chuu-Lian Terng, Ph.D. Brandeis University, Professor Emerita of Mathematics (differential geometry and integrable systems)


Edriss S. Titi, Ph.D. Indiana University, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (analysis and partial differential equations, applied and computational mathematics)


Thomas Trogdon, Ph.D. University of Washington, Assistant Professor of Mathematics (applied and computational mathematics, probability)


Li Sheng Tseng, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Associate Professor of Mathematics (geometry and topology, mathematical physics)


Howard G. Tucker, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (probability and statistics)


Roman Vershynin, Ph.D. University of Missouri-Columbia, Professor of Mathematics (probability, data science)


Jeffrey Viaclovsky, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Mathematics (differential geometry, geometric analysis)


Daqing Wan, Ph.D. University of Washington, Professor of Mathematics (algebra and number theory)


Frederic Yui-Ming Wan, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics; Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering (applied and computational mathematics, mathematical and computational biology)


Robert W. West, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (algebraic toplogy)


Joel J. Westman, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (analysis)


Robert J. Whitley, Ph.D. New Mexico State University, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (analysis)


Janet L. Williams, Ph.D. Brandeis University, Professor Emerita of Mathematics (probability and statistics)


Dominik Franz X. Wodarz, Ph.D. Oxford University, Professor of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Mathematics


Jesse Wolfson, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Assistant Professor of Mathematics (topology)


Jack Xin, Ph.D. New York University, Professor of Mathematics (applied and computational mathematics, mathematical and computational biology, probability)


James J. Yeh, Ph.D. University of Minnesota, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (analysis and partial differential equations, probability)


Yifeng Yu, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of Mathematics (analysis and partial differential equations)


Martin Zeman, Ph.D. Humboldt University of Berlin, Professor of Mathematics; Logic and Philosophy of Science (logic and foundations)


Xiangwen Zhang, Ph.D. McGill University, Assistant Professor of Mathematics (geometry and topology)


Hong-Kai Zhao, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Department Chair and Chancellor's Professor of Mathematics; Computer Science (applied and computational mathematics, inverse problems and imaging)


Weian Zheng, Ph.D. University of Strasbourg, Professor Emeritus of Mathematics (probability theory and financial engineering)

Academic Data

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Career Outcomes

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