Graduate Division

Interdepartmental Neuroscience Gateway Ph.D. Program

Section 1

Overview

The Interdepartmental Neuroscience Program (INP) is a gateway program that provides training in neuroscience in participating departments across the UCI campus:

  • Neurobiology and Behavior
  • Anatomy and Neurobiology
  • Pharmacology
  • Physiology and Biophysics
  • Molecular Biology and Biochemistry
  • Developmental and Cell Biology

Students perform research rotations during the first year to obtain exposure to a range of scientific questions and approaches and to select the best-suited doctoral thesis advisor.  The first year core curriculum includes molecular, cellular, and systems neuroscience, and a dedicated course on Fundamentals in Neuroscience.  INP students benefit from excellent mentoring in research, scientific communication, and professional development.

What Sets Us Apart?

  • UC Irvine’s INP program brings together a neuroscience community representing a broad range of disciplines.  Students are exposed to all levels of neuroscience, including molecular, cellular, systems, and behavioral, as well as basic science and clinical translational science.
  • The UCI neuroscience community is highly interactive and collaborative.  Campus centers, including the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory, the Center for Hearing Research, the Irvine Center for Addiction Neuroscience, the Institute for Memory Impairment and Neurological Disorders, and the Sue and Bill Gross Stem Cell Research Center, provide students with resources, interactions, and opportunities for collaboration within specific research areas.  These groups hold regional and international conferences that provide opportunities for students to present their research and network with others in the field.
  • The INP is committed to excellence in graduate training. Graduate training and inclusive excellence are highest priorities at UC Irvine.  The INP prides itself on our outstanding students and our unwavering commitment to mentoring, which extends beyond the laboratory to include scientific communication and professional development.  We are proud to be training the next generation of leaders in the field of neuroscience.

Quick Facts

Program Type

Gateway Program (students enter a Ph.D. program with one of six affiliated departments in their second year)

Capstone Type

Dissertation

Accordion Section

Admissions Requirements

The INP Executive Committee and Director act as the admissions committee. Following an initial screening of applications, the Executive Committee usually invite potential trainees for an interview at UCI. The Director makes final offers of admissions to applicants, based on the recommendations of the interviewing faculty and the Executive Committee.

Recruitment Period for Fall ’19:

Our recruitment period for Fall 2019 will be January 17-19 and January 31-February 2, 2019 (February subject to change). No other dates will be offered. We look forward to meeting you then!

THE DEADLINE DATE IS DECEMBER 1, 2018 **NO EXCEPTIONS WILL BE MADE AND ALL REQUIRED MATERIALS MUST BE SUBMITTED**

A note for foreign applicants:

Although the INP supports all first year graduate students with a stipend and reimbursement of education fees, foreign students are advised that additional tuition costs are incurred for which the INP or the relevant academic department cannot provide reimbursement during the subsequent years. Support for this additional tuition may be paid directly by the student or may be provided by one of our faculty members. Outstanding foreign applicants are encouraged to contact relevant faculty to determine if they can commit to supporting the student throughout their graduate career at UC Irvine. Without this long term financial commitment, INP is reluctant to accept a foreign student.

Program Application

Applications are made through the Office of Graduate Studies using the Online Application. Once logged in to the online application, the applicant will see that the graduate programs are organized by school. For Interdepartmental Neuroscience, select “School of Biological Sciences” from the school drop-down menu.  Then select “Interdepartmental Neuroscience Ph.D.” from among the programs listed under Biological Sciences.

Financial Support

Most Ph.D. students at UCI are supported by a combination of fellowships, teaching assistantships, research assistantships and faculty training grants. Because student funding is coordinated at the departmental level, be sure to ask your department about your options.

The Graduate Division also offers an array of financial support resources, such as fellowship competitions open to incoming and current UCI students, and funding workshops and writing tutors available through the Graduate Resource Center.

For information on funding opportunities for international graduate students, read more here.

Click here to access the associated nomination and application deadlines for various fellowship opportunities.

Click here for a summary of funding eligibility for UCI graduate students who meet AB540 and/or DACA criteria.

Tuition & Fees

Graduate/Credential Student Fees 2018-19

  Fall 2018 Winter 2019 Spring 2019 Annual
Student Services Fee 376.00 376.00 376.00 1,128.00
Tuition 3,814.00 3,814.00 3,814.00 11,442.00
Assoc. Grad Students Fee 9.00 9.00 9.00 27.00
Student Center Fee 137.88 137.88 137.87 413.63
Bren Events Center Fee 23.00 23.00 23.00 69.00
Recreation Center Fee 88.00 88.00 88.00 264.00
eTech Fee * 60.00 60.00 60.00 180.00
Document Fee † 80.00 0.00 0.00 80.00
Student Health Insurance 1,348.00 1,347.00 1,347.00 4,042.00
Total California Resident $5,795.88 $5,794.88 $5,794.87 $17,385.63
Nonresident Supplemental Tuition 5,034.00 5,034.00 5,034.00 15,102.00
Total Nonresident $10,829.88 $10,828.88 $10,828.87 $32,487.63

Posted 10 August 2018 at http://reg.uci.edu/fees/2018-2019/graduate.html

The tuition, fees, and charges posted to your billing statement or account are estimates based on currently approved amounts. These figures may not be final. Actual tuition, fees, and charges are subject to change by the Regents of the University of California and could be affected by increases or reductions in State funding, or other developments. Accordingly, final approved levels (and thus your final balance due) may differ from the amounts shown.

The non-refundable eTech Fee is required of all students and is used to support the maintenance and improvement of existing education technology, and new services and capabilities. The eTech fee is listed separately as the charged amount varies based on the amount of undergraduate units the student is enrolled in and is assessed later in the term than the other fees listed. The fee is $4 per unit of undergraduate lecture course, up to a maximum amount of $60 (or 15 units) per quarter. It will be assessed after the third week of instruction. The $60 eTech Fee included on this chart reflects the maximum possible fee.

† The Document Fee provides lifetime access to official transcripts and academic verifications without a fee for in-person pickup or delivery by USPS. In addition, there is no fee for mailing the initial diploma. Effective Fall 2018, new undergraduate, professional, and graduate students are assessed the one-time document fee. Eligible students are able to use financial aid to cover the Document Fee.

Core Faculty

Ruth M. Benca, Ph.D. University of Chicago Pritzker School of Medicine, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Mathew M. Blurton-Jones, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Assistant Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Jorge A. Busciglio, Ph.D. Universidad Nacional de Córdoba, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Lawrence F. Cahill, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior; Psychology and Social Behavior


Susana Cohen-Cory, Ph.D. The Rockefeller University, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Carl W. Cotman, Ph.D. Indiana University, Professor of Neurology; Biomedical Engineering; Neurobiology and Behavior


Karina S. Cramer, Ph.D. California Institute of Technology, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Howard J. Federoff, M.D. Ph.D. Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Vice Chancellor for Health Affairs and Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Norbert Fortin, Ph.D. Boston University, Associate Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Christie Fowler, Ph.D. Florida State University, Assistant Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Ron D. Frostig, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior; Biomedical Engineering


Christine M. Gall, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Department Chair and Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology; Neurobiology and Behavior


Sunil P. Gandhi, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Assistant Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Kim Green, Ph.D. University of Leeds, Associate Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Joshua Grill, Ph.D. Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Associate Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


John F. Guzowski, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Associate Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Claudia H. Kawas, M.D. University of Louisville, Nichols Term Chair in Neuroscience and Professor of Neurology; Neurobiology and Behavior


Herbert P. Killackey, Ph.D. Duke University, Professor Emeritus of Neurobiology and Behavior


Frank M. Laferla, Ph.D. University of Minnesota, Dean of the School of Biological Sciences and Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior; Neurology


Michael Leon, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Stephen V. Mahler, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Assistant Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


John F. Marshall, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, Professor Emeritus of Neurobiology and Behavior


James L. McGaugh, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Research Professor and Professor Emeritus of Neurobiology and Behavior; Logic and Philosophy of Science


Bruce L. McNaughton, Ph.D. Carleton University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Raju Metherate, Ph.D. McGill University, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


John Middlebrooks, Ph.D. University of California, San Francisco, Professor of Otolaryngology; Biomedical Engineering; Cognitive Sciences; Linguistics; Neurobiology and Behavior (hearing research, neurophysiology, psychophysics, auditory prosthesis, computational neuroscience)


Ricardo Miledi, M.D. Universidad Nacional Autonoma De Mexico, Professor Emeritus of Neurobiology and Behavior


Andrea C. Nicholas, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Lecturer with Potential Security of Employment of Neurobiology and Behavior


Ian Parker, Ph.D. University College London, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior; Physiology and Biophysics


Steven L. Small, M.D. University of Rochester, Dr. Stanley van den Noort Endowed Chair and Professor of Neurology; Cognitive Sciences; Neurobiology and Behavior


George Sperling, Ph.D. Harvard University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Cognitive Sciences; Neurobiology and Behavior (empirical studies of human information processing: short-term visual memory systems, attention, visual perception, 3-D object recognition; mathematical, computational, and neural models of visual processes: light adaptation, temporal sensitivity, contrast-D)


Craig Stark, Ph.D. Carnegie Mellon University, James L. McGaugh Chair in the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory and Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Arnold Starr, M.D. New York University, Research Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Oswald Steward, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Reeve-Irvine Chair in Spinal Cord Injury Research and Professor of Anatomy and Neurobiology; Neurobiology and Behavior


Georg F. Striedter, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Katumi Sumikawa, Ph.D. Imperial College London, Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Andrea Tenner, Ph.D. University of California, San Diego, Professor of Molecular Biology and Biochemistry; Neurobiology and Behavior


Leslie M. Thompson, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor of Psychiatry and Human Behavior; Biological Chemistry; Neurobiology and Behavior


Marcelo A. Wood, Ph.D. Princeton University, UCI Chancellor's Fellow and Department Chair and Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior


Michael Yassa, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, UCI Chancellor's Fellow and Director of the Center for the Neurobiology of Learning and Memory and Associate Professor of Neurobiology and Behavior

Academic Data

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Students & Alumni