Graduate Division

Education Ph.D.

Section 1

Overview

The School of Education’s doctoral program adopts an interdisciplinary approach to studying learning and development, drawing upon internationally-acclaimed research faculty with expertise in education, psychology, sociology, economics, technology, linguistics and the learning sciences. Doctoral program areas include:

  • Educational Policy and Social Context (EPSC)
  • Human Development in Context (HDiC)
  • Teaching, Learning, and Educational Improvement (TLEI)

We are committed to engaging in scholarly work that improves access and opportunity for individuals and communities over the lifespan. We conduct research from early childhood through adulthood, both in and out of school settings, to advance research on learning and development.

What Sets Us Apart?

The School of Education takes a uniquely interdisciplinary approach to tackle important issues around learning and development throughout the lifespan. Our school approaches education from several vantage points including internal processes within the individual, micro-interactions between people, larger dynamics within and between systems, as well as national and international programs, initiatives, and policies. Drawing on methods and theories from a range of disciplines, we aim to understand how broader institutional, social, and cultural systems both advance and inhibit development. We have a deep commitment to making an impact on educational inequities and advancing opportunities for historically marginalized communities from preK-12 through higher education. We therefore investigate how various educational interventions, such as educational policy, curriculum, digital learning environments, and instructional practices, shape individual and community learning and development.

We take great pride in:

  • Our internationally prominent and interdisciplinary faculty
  • Offering five years of funding to our highly selected community of doctoral students
  • Active involvement in collaborative research apprenticeships from initial entry leading to presentations and publications
  • Increasing access and opportunity for diverse students through research and teaching fellowships
  • Creating research practice partnerships with local schools and community organizations in collaboration with the nationally recognized Center for Educational Partnerships
  • Graduating most PhD students in five years and placing them in research and teaching jobs
  • A vibrant research culture, with over $50 million in research funding from prominent organizations (e.g. National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, Institute for Education Sciences, Spencer Foundation, Gates Foundation)

Quick Facts

Program Type

Doctoral Program

Normative Time to Degree

5 years

Capstone Type

Dissertation

Accordion Section

Admissions Requirements

  •     Completion of a baccalaureate degree with a grade point average of at least 3.0 in the most recent academic degree program
  •     Prior course work or background related to the specialization for which the student expresses interest
  •     Completion of GRE general examination within the past five years and, for international students, TOEFL or IELTS taken within the past two years
Our program has two major criteria for evaluating applicants to our program:
 
1. Applicant's Potential to Conduct Educational Research
The goal of a Ph.D. program is to prepare people to conduct research, both to complete their dissertation and to have successful careers after graduation. Thus a major criterion for our program is our assessment of the applicant's potential to be a highly successful educational researcher.
 
2. Match with Our Program and Faculty
Beyond an applicant's potential as a researcher, we also consider the fit between, on the one hand, the background, trajectory, and research interests of the applicant and, on the other hand, the content of our program and interests of our faculty. We seek applicants who match well with our program specializations and with our faculty's research interests.
 
In evaluating these two criteria, we take into account all aspects of the application. An applicant's educational background (where studied, what studied, and academic performance), letters of recommendation, statement of purpose, writing sample, and standardized test scores (GRE and, when applicable, TOEFL) are all considered as evidence of potential to conduct educational research. The educational background, statement of purpose, and other aspects are considered as evidence of match with our program and faculty. All components of the application are considered together and no single component trumps all others (provided that basic application requirements, such as completion of bachelor's degree and submission of all required material, are met).
 
Finally, in assessing applicants on these criteria, we compare them to all other applicants to the program, with admissions decisions made on a competitive basis. We thus reserve the right to arrive at a decision on late applications even if they are not yet complete, as they will be compared to the completed applications already received. Note, though, that any favorable decisions made on incomplete applications will only be tentative pending the timely receipt of all required application materials.

Additional information regarding the application process is available here.

Financial Support

Currently, the UCI Ph.D. in Education program provides five years of financial support. Doctoral students will be given a combination of Research Assistantships, Teaching Assistantships or Fellowship that will cover tuition, fees, health insurance and provide a 9-month living stipend. All support is contingent on meeting university and program expectations and standards in both academic performance and employment.

Tuition & Fees

Graduate/Credential Student Fees 2018-19

  Fall 2018 Winter 2019 Spring 2019 Annual
Student Services Fee 376.00 376.00 376.00 1,128.00
Tuition 3,814.00 3,814.00 3,814.00 11,442.00
Assoc. Grad Students Fee 9.00 9.00 9.00 27.00
Student Center Fee 137.88 137.88 137.87 413.63
Bren Events Center Fee 23.00 23.00 23.00 69.00
Recreation Center Fee 88.00 88.00 88.00 264.00
eTech Fee * 60.00 60.00 60.00 180.00
Document Fee † 80.00 0.00 0.00 80.00
Student Health Insurance 1,348.00 1,347.00 1,347.00 4,042.00
Total California Resident $5,795.88 $5,794.88 $5,794.87 $17,385.63
Nonresident Supplemental Tuition 5,034.00 5,034.00 5,034.00 15,102.00
Total Nonresident $10,829.88 $10,828.88 $10,828.87 $32,487.63

Posted 10 August 2018 at http://reg.uci.edu/fees/2018-2019/graduate.html

The tuition, fees, and charges posted to your billing statement or account are estimates based on currently approved amounts. These figures may not be final. Actual tuition, fees, and charges are subject to change by the Regents of the University of California and could be affected by increases or reductions in State funding, or other developments. Accordingly, final approved levels (and thus your final balance due) may differ from the amounts shown.

The non-refundable eTech Fee is required of all students and is used to support the maintenance and improvement of existing education technology, and new services and capabilities. The eTech fee is listed separately as the charged amount varies based on the amount of undergraduate units the student is enrolled in and is assessed later in the term than the other fees listed. The fee is $4 per unit of undergraduate lecture course, up to a maximum amount of $60 (or 15 units) per quarter. It will be assessed after the third week of instruction. The $60 eTech Fee included on this chart reflects the maximum possible fee.

† The Document Fee provides lifetime access to official transcripts and academic verifications without a fee for in-person pickup or delivery by USPS. In addition, there is no fee for mailing the initial diploma. Effective Fall 2018, new undergraduate, professional, and graduate students are assessed the one-time document fee. Eligible students are able to use financial aid to cover the Document Fee.

Core Faculty

June Ahn, Ph.D., University of Southern California, 2010, Urban Education Policy, Associate Professor of Education, department profile


Jonathan Alexander, Ph.D. Louisiana State University, Campus Writing Coordinator and Professor of English; Culture and Theory; Education; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Informatics (writing studies, sexuality studies, queer theory, new media studies), department profile


Richard Arum, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Dean of the School of Education and Professor of Education; Criminology, Law and Society; Sociology, department profile


Drew Bailey, Ph.D. University of Missouri, Assistant Professor of Education, department profile


Rachel Baker, Ph.D. Stanford University, Assistant Professor of Education, department profile


Frank D. Bean, Ph.D. Duke University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Sociology; Economics; Education (international migration, demography, Mexican immigration, racial and ethnic relations, economic sociology, family), department profile


Robert J. Beck, Ph.D. University of Chicago, Senate Emeritus of Education


Henry J. Becker, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Professor Emeritus of Education, department profile


Liane R. Brouillette, Ph.D. University of Colorado Boulder, Professor of Education (educational policy, arts-based learning), department profile


Andres Bustamente, Ph.D., University of Miami, 2016, Developmental Psychology, Assistant Professor of Education, department profile


Shanyce Campbell, Ph.D., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, 2014, Public Policy, Assistant Professor of Education, department profile


Elizabeth E. Cauffman, Ph.D. Temple University, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior; Criminology, Law and Society; Education; School of Law (adolescent development, mental health, juvenile justice, legal and social policy), department profile


Chuansheng Chen, Ph.D. University of Michigan, UCI Chancellor's Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior; Education (cross-cultural psychology, adolescent development, cognitive neuroscience, genes and behavior), department profile


Penelope R. Collins, Ph.D. University of Toronto, Associate Professor of Education, department profile


Gilberto Q. Conchas, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of Education; Sociology (urban education, sociology of education, comparative race and ethnicity), department profile


AnneMarie M. Conley, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Assistant Professor of Education, department profile


Carol McDonald Connor, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Chancellor's Professor of Education (language and literacy development, including writing, learning disabilities and dyslexia, deaf and hard of hearing (DHH)), department profile


Greg Duncan, Ph.D. University of Michigan, UCI Distinguished Professor of Education; Economics; Psychology and Social Behavior (economics of education, program evaluation, child development), department profile


Jacquelynne S. Eccles, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, UCI Distinguished Professor of Education; Psychology and Social Behavior (academic motivation and achievement, school and family influences on adolescent development, gender and ethnicity in STEM fields), department profile


Dennis Evans, Ed.D. University of Southern California, Non-Senate Academic Emeritus of Education


George Farkas, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor of Education; Sociology (social ethnic minority education, cognition, behavior), department profile


Cynthia Feliciano, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Sociology; Chicano/Latino Studies; Education (race/ethnicity/minority relations, migration and immigration, education), department profile


David John Frank, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Sociology; Education; Political Science (globalization, sexuality, the natural environment, higher education), department profile


Brandy Gatlin, Ph.D., Florida State University, 2015, Curriculum & Instruction: Special Education, Assistant Professor of Education, department profile


Wendy A. Goldberg, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor of Psychology and Social Behavior; Education (developmental psychology, work and family, infant sleep, transition to parenthood, autism), department profile


Shane Goodridge, Ph.D. University of Victoria, Assistant Teaching Professor of Education, department profile


Gillian Hayes, Ph.D. Georgia Institute of Technology, Robert A. and Barbara L. Kleist Professor of Informatics; Education (interactive and collaborative technology, human-computer interaction, computer-supported cooperative work, educational technology, ubiquitous computing), department profile


Alan R. Hoffer, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Professor Emeritus of Education


Bradley S. Hughes, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer with Security of Employment of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology; Education, department profile


Constance Iloh, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Assistant Professor of Education, department profile


Mizuko Ito, Ph.D. Stanford University, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation Chair in Digital Media and Learning and Professor in Residence of Anthropology; Education; Informatics (ethnography, game studies, youth culture, learning sciences, online communities)


Susanne M. Jaeggi, Ph.D. University of Bern, Associate Professor of Education; Cognitive Sciences (working memory, executive functions, cognitive training, lifespan development aging, individual differences), department profile


Susan C. Jarratt, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, Professor Emerita of Comparative Literature; Education (histories and theories of rhetoric, ancient Greek rhetoric, writing studies)


Jade Marcus Jenkins, Ph.D. University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Assistant Professor of Education, department profile


Hosun Kang, Ph.D. Michigan State University, Assistant Professor of Education, department profile


Young-Suk Kim, Ed.D. Harvard University, Professor of Education, department profile


Glenn S. Levine, Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin, German Language Program Director and Professor of German; Education; Linguistics (applied linguistics, foreign language pedagogy, German-Jewish culture and history, Yiddish language and culture, European culinary history), department profile


Julia R. Lupton, Ph.D. Yale University, Associate Dean for Research and Professor of English; Comparative Literature; Education; Religious Studies (Renaissance literature, literature and psychology), department profile


Virginia Mann, Ph.D. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Professor of Linguistics; Education (reading ability: phenome awareness, developmental dyslexia, phonological skills, early intervention, precocious readers; speech perception: context effects, cross-linguistic comparisons), department profile


Jack R. McCullough, Ph.D. United States International University, Lecturer with Security of Employment Emeritus of Education


Carol Booth Olson, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Professor of Education, department profile


Elizabeth Peña, Ph.D., Temple University, 1993, Speech, Language, Hearing Sciences, Professor of Education, department profile


Emily K. Penner, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Assistant Professor of Education, department profile


Kylie Peppler, Ph.D., UCLA, 2007, Urban Schooling/Education, Associate Professor of Informatics and Education, department profile


Rita W. Peterson, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Senior Lecturer with Security of Employment Emerita of Education


Stephanie Reich, Ph.D. Vanderbilt University, Associate Professor of Education; Informatics; Psychology and Social Behavior (child development, parenting, peer interactions, media, program evaluation)


Lindsey Richland, Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles, 2003, Psychology; Associate Professor of Education, department profile


Ruben G. Rumbaut, Ph.D. Brandeis University, Distinguished Professor of Sociology; Chicano/Latino Studies; Criminology, Law and Society; Education (international migration, immigration laws, criminalization, incarceration, social inequality and mobility, race and ethnicity), department profile


Judith Haymore Sandholtz, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor of Education, department profile


Rossella Santagata, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of Education, department profile


Robin C. Scarcella, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Professor of Academic English/English as a Second Language; Education, department profile


Sabrina E. Schuck, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Health Sciences Assistant Clinical Professor of Pediatrics; Education; Psychology and Social Behavior (ADHD, autistic spectrum disorders, disorders of reading and written language, human-animal intervention, non-pharmacological treatment of disruptive behavior, cognitive-behavioral school-based and family-based interventions), department profile


Sandra Simpkins, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Associate Professor of Education (organized after-school activities, motivation, family influences, diversity and equity, immigration and culture, STEM), department profile


Timothy M. Tift, M.A. Pepperdine University, Lecturer with Security of Employment Emeritus of Education, department profile


Elizabeth van Es, Ph.D. Northwestern University, Associate Professor of Education, department profile


Deborah Lowe Vandell, Ph.D. Boston University, Professor of Education; Psychology and Social Behavior (longitudinal studies of development, early childhood education, after-school programs, summer learning, child development, adolescent development), department profile


Mark J. Warschauer, Ph.D. University of Hawaii at Manoa, Professor of Education; Informatics (language, literacy, technology, STEM), department profile


Di Xu, Ph.D. Columbia University, Assistant Professor of Education, department profile

Academic Data

academic data

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Career Outcomes

career outcomes data

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