Graduate Division

MFA Programs in Writing

Section 1

Overview

  • Graduates of the Programs in Writing receive a Master of Fine Arts (MFA) degree in English.
  • The Program is two years, with the option of a third year devoted to working on a Poetry or Fiction thesis.
  • Individual attention and one-on-one meetings are an important part of this small program, which accepts twelve students a year from a pool of approximately 400 applicants.
  • Workshops, seminars, contact with visiting writers and readings by literary writers from all over the US are central to the program.
  • MFA candidates may be selected to work as editors of Faultline, UCI's Pushcart Prize winning literary and arts journal.

What Sets Us Apart?

  • Past or upcoming visiting writers and lecturers include: Ralph Angel, John Ashbery, F. Douglas Brown, Ethan Canin, Victoria Chang, Killarney Clary, Natalie Diaz, Stuart Dybek, Percival Everett, Louise Glück, Jay Gummerman, Ursula Hegi, Brenda Hillman, Cynthia Huntington, P.D. James, Brigit Pegeen Kelly, Ada Limon, Margot Livesey, Thomas Lux, Lynne McMahon, Heather McHugh, Maile Meloy, Josephine Miles, Harryette Mullen, Wright Morris, Howard Moss, Carol Muske-Dukes, Robert Olmstead, Ann Patchett, Bette Pesetsky, Martha Rhodes, Mark Richard, Mary Robison, Thomas Sanchez, Sherod Santos, Christine Schutt, Lynn Sharon Schwartz, Alan Shapiro, Danzy Senna, Vijay Seshadri, Jim Shepard, Mona Simpson, Danez Smith, Ted Solotaroff, Pamela Stewart, Robert Stone, Mark Strand, Mary Szybist, and Joy Williams.
  • Alumni of the program include: Ramona Ausubel, Aimee Bender, Leonard Chang, Michael Chabon, Joshua Ferris, Richard Ford, Yusef Komunyakaa, Alice Sebold, Matt Sumell, Matthew Thomas, Helena Maria Viramontes, Mary Yukari Waters, and Allison Benis White.

Quick Facts

Program Type

Academic Master's Program

Normative Time to Degree

3 years

Capstone Type

Thesis

Accordion Section

Admissions Requirements

Admissions are made for the fall quarter of each year. The Programs in Writing do not admit applicants for the winter or spring quarters. Students are admitted to either the fiction or poetry program. Admission is highly competitive. Approximately twelve students are admitted into the Programs in Writing each year: up to six in fiction and up to six in poetry. The Admissions Committee places particular weight on the quality of the writing, looking not only for evidence of talent but for indication of a permanent and firm commitment to the craft of writing. The Program takes pride in an impressive achievement of publication by its graduates.

A bachelor's degree with a minimum 3.0 GPA is a University prerequisite for admission, which may be waived in exceptional cases. The application for admission should specify interest in either fiction or poetry and must include three letters of recommendation, official transcripts of all academic work, an autobiographical statement, and samples of writing. Graduate Record Examination (GRE) test scores are not required for admission into the Programs in Writing.

All offers of admission for the 2019-2020 academic year will be made by March 25, 2019. These candidates must accept or decline their offer and financial support package no later than April 15, 2019.


Candidates who have been placed on a wait list will also be notified by April 1, 2019, and offered admission and support as places become available.


Applicants who have not been notified of admission or placement on the wait list by April 2, 2019 should assume they will not be offered admission. Because of the high number of applications and limited staff, it is not possible to send out denial notifications until late spring. Applicants who wish to confirm their application status sooner, may contact the Programs in Writing after April 16, 2019.

Financial Support

Domestic Students

The Department of English is committed to providing three full years of financial support to all domestic students in the MFA Programs in Writing. Students are supported equally in order to foster an atmosphere of community rather than competition.

Financial support for MFA students is given in the form of Teaching Assistantships (also referred to as Tuition Fellowships for out-of-state students). Teaching Assistantships provide full tuition coverage as well as University health insurance (medical, dental, and vision). MFA students on TA-ship are also assigned to teach one undergraduate composition or creative writing course per quarter (three courses per academic year). MFA students receive academic credit as well as a nine-month salary for teaching. Students will earn an estimated $20,650.00 for the academic year. Annual renewal of a TA-ship is contingent upon satisfactory academic progress and teaching performance. Out-of-state students admitted into the program are required to file for California residency by the end of their first year in order to continue receiving financial support.

International Students

As a state funded institution, there is very limited financial support available for international students. Unfortunately, full financial support is rarely possible. International students admitted into the Programs in Writing are responsible for paying the Nonresident Tuition and fees in addition to housing and the cost of living.

Graduate Housing

UCI offers six graduate housing communities: Palo Verde, Verano Place, Vista Del Campo, Vista Del Campo Norte, Pureta Del Sol, and Campus Village. Rates and amenities vary in each community. For more information please visit UCI Student Housing website or call (949) 824-6811. Campus housing costs are not covered by the Teaching Assistantship financial package.

Tuition & Fees

Graduate/Credential Student Fees 2018-19

  Fall 2018 Winter 2019 Spring 2019 Annual
Student Services Fee 376.00 376.00 376.00 1,128.00
Tuition 3,814.00 3,814.00 3,814.00 11,442.00
Assoc. Grad Students Fee 9.00 9.00 9.00 27.00
Student Center Fee 137.88 137.88 137.87 413.63
Bren Events Center Fee 23.00 23.00 23.00 69.00
Recreation Center Fee 88.00 88.00 88.00 264.00
eTech Fee * 60.00 60.00 60.00 180.00
Document Fee † 80.00 0.00 0.00 80.00
Student Health Insurance 1,348.00 1,347.00 1,347.00 4,042.00
Total California Resident $5,795.88 $5,794.88 $5,794.87 $17,385.63
Nonresident Supplemental Tuition 5,034.00 5,034.00 5,034.00 15,102.00
Total Nonresident $10,829.88 $10,828.88 $10,828.87 $32,487.63

Posted 10 August 2018 at http://reg.uci.edu/fees/2018-2019/graduate.html

The tuition, fees, and charges posted to your billing statement or account are estimates based on currently approved amounts. These figures may not be final. Actual tuition, fees, and charges are subject to change by the Regents of the University of California and could be affected by increases or reductions in State funding, or other developments. Accordingly, final approved levels (and thus your final balance due) may differ from the amounts shown.

The non-refundable eTech Fee is required of all students and is used to support the maintenance and improvement of existing education technology, and new services and capabilities. The eTech fee is listed separately as the charged amount varies based on the amount of undergraduate units the student is enrolled in and is assessed later in the term than the other fees listed. The fee is $4 per unit of undergraduate lecture course, up to a maximum amount of $60 (or 15 units) per quarter. It will be assessed after the third week of instruction. The $60 eTech Fee included on this chart reflects the maximum possible fee.

† The Document Fee provides lifetime access to official transcripts and academic verifications without a fee for in-person pickup or delivery by USPS. In addition, there is no fee for mailing the initial diploma. Effective Fall 2018, new undergraduate, professional, and graduate students are assessed the one-time document fee. Eligible students are able to use financial aid to cover the Document Fee.

Core Faculty

Jonathan Alexander, Ph.D. Louisiana State University, Campus Writing Coordinator and Professor of English; Culture and Theory; Education; Gender and Sexuality Studies; Informatics (writing studies, sexuality studies, queer theory, new media studies)


Bobbie J. Allen, Ph.D. University of Washington, Lecturer of English


Elizabeth G. Allen, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Associate Professor of English; Comparative Literature; Religious Studies (Chaucer, Gower, 15th century poetry; exemplary literature, romance, chronicle, episodic form; intersections between ethics and politics, politics and religion; hospitality, sovereignty, legal and constitutional history of England)


Michael Andreasen, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English


Stephen A. Barney, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of English


Jami Bartlett, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of English (The 19th-Century Novel, literature and philosophy, narrative theory)


Alice C. Berghof, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Humanities; English


Emily M. Brauer, M.A. University of Southern California, Lecturer of English


Carol M. Burke, Ph.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Professor of English; Religious Studies (literary and cultural theory, literary journalism, new media studies)


Ellen S. Burt, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor Emerita of English (eighteenth-century French literature and nineteenth-century poetry)


James L. Calderwood, Ph.D. University of Washington, Professor Emeritus of English


Chieh L. Chieng, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English


Jerome C. Christensen, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor Emeritus of English (Hollywood motion pictures, corporate authorship, romantic literature)


Michael P. Clark, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Professor Emeritus of English


Rachael L. Collins, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English


Miles Corwin, M.A. University of Missouri-Columbia, Professor of English (law enforcement, the criminal justice system, homicide, inner-city education, affirmative action)


Keith Danner, Ph.D. University of California, Riverside, Lecturer of English


Rebecca Davis, Ph.D. University of Notre Dame, Associate Professor of English; Religious Studies (Old and Middle English literature, Piers Plowman, medieval religious culture, women’s writing, medieval philosophy)


Susan E. Davis, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English


Lorene D. Delany-Ullman, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English


Amy Depaul, B.A. Boston University, Lecturer of English


Jaya Dubey, M.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English


Kathryn Eason, M.A. University of Colorado Boulder, Lecturer of English


Loren P. Eason, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English


Christopher Fan, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Assistant Professor of English (transnational Asia American, 20th, and 21st century literature, speculative fiction, political economy)


Anita W. Fischer, M.A. Loyola Marymount University, Lecturer of English


Robert Folkenflik, Ph.D. Cornell University, Edward A. Dickson Emeriti Professorship and Professor Emeritus of English


Linda M. Georgianna, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor Emerita of English


Amy Gerstler, M.F.A. Bennington College, Professor of English (poetry, creative writing, fiction, creative nonfiction, hybrid literature, visual art, lyric essay, art and science, women writers)


Richard Godden, Ph.D. University of Kent, Professor of English (20th century and contemporary American literature, Faulkner)


Daniel Gross, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of English (emotion studies, history and theory of rhetoric, early modern literature and culture, Heidegger and rhetoric)


Alberto D. Gullaba, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English


Linda G. Haas, Ph.D. University of South Florida, Lecturer of English


Martin Harries, Ph.D. Yale University, Professor of English (20th century theater, critical theory)


Erika Hayasaki, B.A. University of Illinois at Urbana–Champaign, Associate Professor of English (literary journalism in the digital age, narrative nonfiction, immersion journalism, youth, culture, crime, poverty, health, science, education, urban affairs, death)


Rebeca Louise Helfer, Ph.D. Columbia University, Associate Professor of English (Renaissance literature and culture, memory, Spenser)


Andrea K. Henderson, Ph.D. University of Pennsylvania, Professor of English (19th century literature, literature and visual arts, literature and science)


John W. Hollowell, Ph.D. University of Michigan, Senior Lecturer with Security of Employment Emeritus of English


Oren J. Izenberg, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Associate Professor of English (poetics, modern and contemporary poetry, 20th century literature and culture, philosophy and literature)


Virginia W. Jackson, Ph.D. Princeton University, Chair in Rhetoric and Communication and Associate Professor of English; Comparative Literature (poetics, 19th, 20th and 21st century American poetry, 19th century American literature and culture, the history of literary theory)


Joseph Jonghyun Jeon, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of English (Asian-American literature, film modernism)


Leah C. Kaminski, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English


Laura H. Kang, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Cruz, Professor of Gender and Sexuality Studies; English (feminist epistemologies and theories, cultural studies, ethnic studies)


Charlene J. Keeler, M.A. California State University, Fullerton, Lecturer of English


Jonathan I. Keeperman, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English


Tarah M. Keeperman, M.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English


Arlene Keizer, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of English; Comparative Literature (African American and Caribbean literature, critical race and ethnic studies, feminist and psychoanalytic theory, cultural studies)


Douglas V. Kiklowicz, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English


Peter O. Krapp, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, Department Chair and Professor of Film and Media Studies; English; Informatics; Music; Visual Studies (digital culture, media history, cultural memory)


P. Michelle Latiolais, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Professor of English (creative writing, fiction, contemporary literature)


Karen R. Lawrence, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor Emerita of English


Rodrigo Lazo, Ph.D. University of Maryland, College Park, Associate Professor of English; Culture and Theory (hemispheric American studies, nineteenth century, Latino studies and the Americas, Cuba, immigrant literature)


Jerry Won Lee, Ph.D. University of Arizona, Associate Professor of English; Anthropology; Culture and Theory


Jayne Elizabeth Lewis, Ph.D. Princeton University, Director of Humanities Honors Program and Professor of English; Religious Studies (literature and medicine, restoration and 18th century British literature, literature of the supernatural and gothic fiction, history and/of fiction, atmosphere as literary concept and construct within natural philosophy)


Julia R. Lupton, Ph.D. Yale University, Associate Dean for Research and Professor of English; Comparative Literature; Education; Religious Studies (Renaissance literature, literature and psychology)


Juliet F. MacCannell, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor Emerita of English


Steven J. Mailloux, Ph.D. University of Southern California, Professor Emeritus of English; Comparative Literature (rhetoric, critical theory, American literature, law and literature)


Theodore Martin, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor of English (Contemporary literature, genre fiction, literary history, crime, and the novel)


Annie McClanahan, Ph.D. University of California, Berkely, Associate Professor of English (U.S. culture, the novel, political and economic theory)


Gregory J. McClure, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English


Lowell B. McKay, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English


James L. McMichael, Ph.D. Stanford University, Professor Emeritus of English


John Miles, Ph.D. Harvard University, Professor Emeritus of English; Religious Studies (religion, literature, international relations, western scriptures [Jewish, Christian, Muslim] as literature; religious poetry and music, religion, science, and the environment)


J. Hillis Miller, Ph.D. Harvard University, UCI Endowed Chair and Professor Emeritus of Comparative Literature; English (Victorian literature, critical theory)


Tyrus Miller, Ph.D. Stanford University, Dean of the School of Humanities and Professor of English; Art History; Visual Studies (modernist and avant-garde studies in literature and visual arts; critical theory and aesthetics; modern architecture and urbanism; East-Central European studies; culture of socialism and post-socialism; Frankfurt School theory)


Jane O. Newman, Ph.D. Princeton University, Professor of Comparative Literature; English; European Languages and Studies; Religious Studies (comparative Renaissance and early modern literature and culture [English, French, German, Italian, neo-Latin], Mediterranean Renaissance studies, Baroque, afterlives of antiquity, Walter Benjamin, Erich Auerbach, pre-modern lessons for the modern and post-modern)


Robert W. Newsom, Ph.D. Columbia University, Professor Emeritus of English


Margot Norris, Ph.D. State University of New York College at Buffalo, Professor Emerita of English; Comparative Literature (modern Irish, British, American and continental modernism, literature and war)


Laura B. O'Connor, Ph.D. Columbia University, Associate Professor of English; Comparative Literature (Irish literature, twentieth-century poetry, Anglo-American modernism)


Robert L. Peters, Ph.D. University of Wisconsin-Madison, Professor Emeritus of English


Bradley A. Queen, Ph.D. Boston University, Lecturer with Security of Employment of English


Rajagopalan Radhakrishnan, Ph.D. Binghamton University, State University of New York, UCI Chancellor's Professor of English; African American Studies; Comparative Literature; Culture and Theory (critical theory, postcoloniality, nationalisms and diasporas, poststructuralism, postmodernism, democracy and minority discourse, cultural studies, globalization and transnationalism)


Barbara L. Reed, Ph.D. Indiana University, Lecturer with Security of Employment Emerita of English


Hugh J. Roberts, Ph.D. McGill University, Associate Professor of English (romantic literature, Shelley, literature and science, chaos theory and literature, politics and literature)


John C. Rowe, Ph.D. State University of New York College at Buffalo, Professor Emeritus of English; Comparative Literature


Michael Ryan, Ph.D. University of Iowa, Professor of English; Religious Studies (American literature, creative writing, poetry, poetics, autobiography)


Edgar T. Schell, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor Emeritus of English


Gretchen K. Short, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of Humanities; English


Barry E. Siegel, M.S. Columbia University, Professor of English (literary journalism, English)


Victoria A. Silver, Ph.D. University of California, Los Angeles, Associate Professor of English; European Languages and Studies; Religious Studies (early modern literature and culture, religious studies, history and theory of rhetoric, literature and philosophy)


Richard A. Sims, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English


James Steintrager, Ph.D. Columbia University, Director of the Emphasis in Critical Theory and Professor of English; European Languages and Studies (eighteenth-century comparative literature, ethical philosophy and literature, systems theory, amatory and erotic fiction)


Michael F. Szalay, Ph.D. Johns Hopkins University, Department Chair and Professor of English; Film and Media Studies; Visual Studies (contemporary television and literature)


Ngugi Wa Thiong'O, B.A. Makerere University, UCI Distinguished Professor of Comparative Literature; English (African and Caribbean literatures, theater and film, performance studies, cultural and political theory)


Brook Thomas, Ph.D. University of California, Santa Barbara, UCI Chancellor's Professor Emeritus of English (U.S. literature and culture, law and literature, literature and history)


Harold E. Toliver, Ph.D. University of Washington, Professor Emeritus of English


Andrew T. Tonkovich, M.F.A. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English


Irene Tucker, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of English (Victorian studies)


Georges Y. Van Den Abbeele, Ph.D. Cornell University, Professor of Comparative Literature; English; European Languages and Studies (French and European philosophical literature, travel narrative and tourism/migration studies, critical theory and aesthetics, francophone literature, history of cartography, media history and theory)


Ann J. Van Sant, Ph.D. University of California, Berkeley, Associate Professor Emerita of English (restoration and 18th century literature)


Andrzej J. Warminski, Ph.D. Yale University, Associate Dean for Academic Personnel and Professor of English; European Languages and Studies; Humanities (romanticism, history of literary theory, contemporary theory, literature and philosophy)


Jacqueline Y. Way, Ph.D. University of California, Irvine, Lecturer of English


Henry Weinstein, J.D. University of California, Berkeley, Professor of School of Law; English


Amy Wilentz, B.A. Harvard University, Professor of English (formal mechanisms of literary journalism, travel journalism as a literary form, explanatory journalism, role of journalism for the everyday reader)


Geoffrey Wolff, B.A. Princeton University, Professor Emeritus of English

Academic Data

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Students & Alumni

Coming soon.